Challenge

posted in: Uncategorized | 0


Which Vegan Company will go Beyond Impossible and create a veganic burger?


Non of these vegan products are veganic because the ingrediants to make them were grown using chemicals and animal fertiliser such fish, blood, bone and manure (slaughter house byproducts).

Many farms are now turning veganic, if these vegan companies start sourcing veganic ingrediants, we will have the makings of a real food revolution, where we are no longer dependent on animal agriculture and pestisides to grow our food.

We must now engage the million/billion dollar (and smaller) vegan food companies and chellenge them to make veganic products, which in turn would transform agriculture, from destroying the planet to healing it.

VEGAN ORGANIC NETWORK (VON)

We need your support to continue working towards creating safe and ethical food production, by enriching the soil and actively encouraging wild life and pollinators. We support farmers & growers and those in transition; produce educational materials, deliver talks and training courses and raise public awareness of how your food is grown.

The Vegan Organic Network is the only organization in the UK solely working for food to be grown the certified VEGANIC way.

For a green, clean, cruelty free planet.

DONATE

Join/Support


challenge

posted in: Uncategorized | 0

Which Vegan Company will go Beyond Impossible and create a veganic burger?

Non of these vegan products are veganic because the ingredients to make them were grown using chemicals and animal fertiliser such fish, blood, bone and manure (slaughter house byproducts).

Many farms are now turning veganic, if these vegan companies start sourcing veganic ingrediants, we will have the makings of a real food revolution, where we are no longer dependent on animal agriculture and pestisides to grow our food.

We must now engage the million/billion dollar (and smaller) vegan food companies and chellenge them to make veganic products, which in turn would transform agriculture, from destroying the planet to healing it.

VEGAN ORGANIC NETWORK (VON)

We need your support to continue working towards creating safe and ethical food production, by enriching the soil and actively encouraging wild life and pollinators. We support farmers & growers and those in transition; produce educational materials, deliver talks and training courses and raise public awareness of how your food is grown.

The Vegan Organic Network is the only organization in the UK solely working for food to be grown the certified VEGANIC way.

For a green, clean, cruelty free planet.

DONATE

Join/Support

download (6).jpg
download (9).jpg

Job Seasonal Field Grower April – November 2019

posted in: Uncategorized | 0

Job Description 2019
Seasonal Field Grower April – November 2019
Background
This is an excellent opportunity for the right candidate to work and learn about stock free organic principles of field-scale food production at an award winning long-established horticultural farm in South Oxfordshire, UK.
We are situated in a beautiful part of the country, with private access to the River Thames and many miles of lovely walks through the Estate and surrounding area. Pangbourne, our nearest town, is two miles away and has direct train access to other areas. The surrounding countryside is an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and is rich in wildlife and bio-diversity. For more information about our award winning farm visit our website  www.tolhurstorganic.co.uk
The opportunity
One person full time fixed-term position for candidates keen to learn more about organic principles of field-scale food production. Training will also be given to operate irrigation equipment. Opportunities to attend on-site workshops and seminars. 
We attract a lot of interest from people from a wide range of backgrounds who come to see what we are doing here and we are a demonstration farm holding regular seminars and farm walks. Different people turn up to work at odd times so there is a lively atmosphere to the place.
Essential Skills Required
• Practical experience with tractors and machinery
• Simple running repairs/maintenance of equipment
• Team leadership in the field, for planting/hoeing/harvesting operations.
Other requirements
• Flexibility in working hours/days.
• Full UK driving licence
• 2-3 years experience with horticulture is a plus
Responsibilities
The main part of the job is to grow field vegetables on our 17 acres using a range of equipment and tractors. You will also be working alongside our team of 3-7 in the walled garden and fields and be expected to lead the team for field operations. You will sometimes be expected to work alone. Two days each week are harvesting and packing vegetables for our own Box Scheme and wholesale customers and you may be asked to help, if available. 
Planting, hoeing, crop tending, mowing/growing green manure and harvesting being the main work, which is varied; it is unusual to be on the same job for more than half a day at a time. 
Local deliveries will be expected on odd occasions, using company vehicle. Operating irrigation equipment, you will be trained to do this, using and maintaining farm machinery.

Work Hours
The job is fixed-term from April to November, with a month probation period. The contract can be negotiated for recurring terms every year from April to November or as a permanent job in the future. 
Hours in general it will be no more than 40 hours per week, but more may be expected during busy periods in the summer. 
Occasional weekend work may be needed during the summer. 
Hourly Wages and Holiday
Rates of pay are higher than minimum wage and are negotiable. Payment will be made monthly, in arrears. 
Holiday entitlement is according to UK Employment Law.
Fringe benefits
Accommodation on site in a three-bedroom shared flat. It is essential that the applicant is prepared to live on site as there are regular tasks during the summer to be seen to.
Vegetables are available free of charge for personal use. 
References
References from most recent employers/tutors will be sought at offer stage.
Deadlines
Apply by 4 March 2019
Interviews – 18 March 2019 (Only those selected will be contacted. We regret that we do not offer job applications feedback)
Job offer made – 20 March
Job start – 1 April 2019

Green shoots: how veganism is changing gardening

posted in: Uncategorized | 0


Giving up animal products this year? If so, you might want to rethink how you garden

There are not many big ideas that come along in gardening. After all, horticulture has been much the same since for ever: sow seeds, add manure, water and feed, and kill pests. But now, something revolutionary could transform the staid old world of grow-your-own: vegan gardening.

Unless you’ve been living on Mars, you will be aware that veganism is on the rise: one in eight Britons now identify as vegan or vegetarianrecord numbers have gone meat-free this month; and supermarkets and high streets – hello, Greggs – are helping to turn it mainstream. But did you know that gardening can be vegan, too?

Vegan gardening is essentially a super-organic method that avoids any animal input – from manure to fertiliser. It is an important part of the vegan movement; it means you’re doing your bit for the environment and producing clean, ethically produced crops that are safe to eat, while sticking two fingers up to animal farming. Once ultra niche, it is starting to enter the mainstream: the first vegan garden festival was held last September in Hampshire, hosted by Chelsea winner Cleve West, while Joseph Gibson’s Conscious Consumerism garden at Hampton Court flower show last July graphically illustrated the ruinous effects of animal agriculture.

In vegan gardening, you have to be mindful of what you put on your crops. Animal manures used to help plants grow can be contaminated with infectious diseases such as E coli and listeria, as well as persistent herbicides. While manure-borne salmonella or campylobacter could make you ill, persistent herbicides could kill your crops, which rather defeats the point of adding manure. Instead, make your own compost from layers of nitrogen-rich green material (grass cuttings, peelings, leafy prunings) and carbon-rich brown material (dry leaves, straw, card, shredded woody prunings), sourced from kitchen, household and garden waste. The pile needs to be moist and warm to decompose through microbial action. Turn with a garden fork every month or two, and in six months you should have enough black, crumbly compost to grow your plants in. (Using peat is vegan, but is generally believed to be environmentally unsustainable: peat bogs are carbon sinks and, once mined, take up to 100 years to regenerate.)

Jerusalem Artichokes ‘Fuseau’ in a metal basket
 Jerusalem artichokes. Photograph: Alamy

It’s not just animal manure that should be avoided: many commercial composts and fertilisers contain animal products such as blood, fish and bone – byproducts taken from the slaughterhouse floor. To help sustain your plants, make comfrey-based liquid fertiliser: put chopped comfrey (or nettles, borage, seaweed or other nutrient-rich plants) in a bucket of water and leave it for a few weeks until it starts to stink. Dilute and decant over crops to add nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium, as well as vitamin B12. These are the three primary ingredients required for healthy plant growth – comfrey’s high potassium levels particularly aid fruit production.

It’s true that vegan gardening is harder work then conventional gardening, because it is unethical to nuke “pests” and diseases. But with an ecosystem of weed banks, cover crops and the consequent beneficial insects in place, you shouldn’t have to.

To make your soil as nutrient-rich as possible, sow green manure cover crops such as clover, mustard, phacelia and buckwheat. Ideally, your soil should always be covered (especially in winter) to stop erosion, and to harvest nitrogen from the air; rake back the green manure into the soil (the worms will drag the nutrients underground, while the cover crop roots will help break up the earth).

Crop rotation in a vegetable patch will help maintain soil health, avoid nutrient deficiency and stop pest and disease buildup: plant a green manure, then alternate annual crops of potatoes, legumes, brassicas and root veg followed by squash and sweet corn, on a four- to seven-year cycle. Chances are, if you’re tempted by vegan gardening, you’re a vegan yourself, so grow what might be useful additions to your diet: vegetables such as spinach or jerusalem artichokes are high in iron; broad beans provide protein and fibre.

There is one aspect of vegan gardening that is easier than conventional gardening: you don’t need to dig. Digging over wrecks the soil and its fauna, creating compaction and erosion. Hoe off weeds instead; you should get fewer weeds anyway, because digging creates a hotbed for weed seeds. But don’t take the “no-dig” rule too far: someone once asked me if it was OK to dig up your potatoes!

The really positive part of vegan gardening is the benefits for animals and insects; the aim is not to kill anything, and as far as possible leave garden wildlife alone. Insects and invertebrates (particularly worms) are essential parts of a garden’s ecosystem, whether they are maintaining soil structure or providing a link in the food chain.

A bunch of freshly pulled carrots with mud on the vegetables.
 Freshly-pulled carrots. Photograph: Getty Images

Instead, there are ways of dissuading the animals you don’t want from entering your garden. Don’t feed birds, as this will attract rodents. If you must, use barriers such as nets to protect crops from birds, or liquid repellants such as Grazers’ Live, and Let Grow deterrent sprays for anything from lily beetles to squirrels. Create habitats among cover crops and wild patches for those creatures you would like to see: beneficial pollinators, predator insects such as ladybirds, hoverflies, lacewings and ground beetles.

Slugs are a pain because they eat young, green plants, so plant these out when they are more mature and less attractive to pests. Plant sacrificial plants, such as lettuce or brassica leaves, as an alternative food supply to the crops you want to flourish; pick off slugs by hand (gently); encourage slug eaters such as hedgehogs with wood and leaf piles, and by planting hedges instead of walls or fences. And if slugs do eat your salad leaves and bugs munch your apples, leave them to it – now, there’s a new idea.Advertisement

• Matthew Appleby’s The Super Organic Gardener: Everything You Need To Know About A Vegan Garden is published on 31 January, at £16.99. To order a copy for £14.95, visit guardianbookshop.com.

Bristol onion Allium sphaerocephalon, in flower, with seven-spot ladybird on it